Core Curriculum Courses

I. Skill Areas

A. English Composition

Composition I
Select one of the following:3
College Composition 1 Co-Requisite 1
College Composition I (OTM) 1
Composition II
Select one of the following:3
College Composition II: Academic Disciplines And Discourse (OTM) 2
Science And Technical Report Writing (OTM) 2
Professional and Business Writing (OTM) 2
Total Hours6

B. Mathematics

Select one of the following:3-5
Reasoning With Mathematics (OTM)
Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving
Mathematics For Education Majors I 1
Mathematics For Education Majors II (OTM) 1
College Algebra (OTM) 1
Trigonometry (OTM) 1
College Algebra And Trigonometry (OTM) 1
Calculus with Applications to Business and Finance (OTM) 1
Calculus For The Life Sciences With Applications I (OTM) 1
Calculus For The Life Sciences With Applications II (OTM) 1
Calculus I For Mathematicians, Scientists And Educators (OTM) 1
Calculus II For Mathematicians, Scientists And Educators (OTM) 1
Single Variable Calculus I (OTM) 1
Single Variable Calculus II (OTM) 1
Elementary Linear Algebra (OTM) 1
Statistics for Applied Science
Calculus For Engineering Technology I (OTM) 1
Calculus For Engineering Technology II (OTM) 1
Introduction To Statistics (OTM) 1
Total Hours3-5

II. Distributive Areas

A. Arts and Humanities

Such a course is likely to reside in the arts, classics, literature, history, language, religion or philosophy. Arts and Humanities courses should be broad-based; narrowly focused courses will generally not fulfill this requirement. In order to qualify for the core curriculum, a course must fulfill at least one, and should strive for a preponderance, of the five criteria below:

  1. Provide an introduction to a particular arts or humanities discipline;
  2. Provide historical perspectives of our world;
  3. Provide an overview of philosophical systems that compete for our attention;                                      
  4. Provide a broad understanding of literary or cultural currents of the past and/or the present; and,
  5. Present cross-cultural perspectives.

After completing the arts and humanities core curriculum, a student should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively: All core curriculum programs include a component for writing; many also include a component for oral communication or presentation
  2. Evaluate arguments in a logical fashion: Competence in analysis and logical argument are explicit learning goals for most core curriculum programs, although these skills go by a variety of names (e.g., critical thinking, analysis, logical thinking, etc.)
  3. Employ the methods of inquiry characteristic of natural sciences, social sciences, and the arts and humanities: The tools for solving problems vary across disciplines; the core curriculum introduces students to methods of inquiry in several fields of study and thereby prepares students to integrate information from different disciplines
  4. Acquire an understanding of our global and diverse culture and society
  5. Engage in our democratic society: One of the overarching goals of the core curriculum is to prepare students to be active and informed citizens, the development of a disposition to participate in and contribute to our democracy is full of equal importance to the goal of having the skills to do so intelligently.
Arts and Humanities
Select two courses; minimum of six hours total from the following; no more than one course from any discipline:6
Art
Multi-Cultural Art Appreciation A Lived Game of Contemporary Art
Foundations of Art Studio Technology
Foundations of 2D Design 1
Foundations of 3D Design
Foundations of Drawing I
Art Journey (OTM)
Art History
Art In History (OTM)
History Of Modern Art
History of Graphic Design
Communication
Comm Principles And Practices
Mass Communication And Society
Interpersonal Communication
Film/Video
Introduction To Film (OTM)
Foreign Language and Culture
Culture and Commerce in the Arabic-Speaking World 1
Culture of the Arabic-Speaking World 1
Elementary Arabic II
Intermediate Arabic I
Intermediate Arabic II
Chinese Culture
Elementary Chinese II
Intermediate Chinese I
Intermediate Chinese II
Culture And Commerce In The French-Speaking World
World Cultures through Literature and Cinema in Translation
French & Francophone Culture In The Modern World
Elementary French II
Intermediate French I
Intermediate French II
German Culture And Commerce
Introduction To Modern German Culture
Elementary German II
Intermediate German I
Intermediate German II
Japanese Culture And Commerce 1
Introduction To Japanese Culture 1
Elementary Japanese II
Intermediate Japanese I
Intermediate Japanese II
Elementary Latin II
Intermediate Latin I
Intermediate Latin II
Culture & Commerce In The Spanish-Speaking World
Culture Of Latin America 1
Culture Of Spain
Elementary Spanish II
Review Of Elementary Spanish
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
History
Europe To 1600 (OTM)
Europe From 1600 (OTM)
World History To 1500 (OTM) 1
World History From 1500 (OTM)
The Contemporary World (OTM) 1
East Asia To 1800 (OTM) 1
East Asia From 1800 (OTM) 1
Latin American Civilizations (OTM) 1
African Civilization (OTM) 1
Middle East Civilization (OTM) 1
Introduction To Historical Thinking
America To 1865 (OTM)
America From 1865 (OTM)
Ancient Near East (OTM) 1
Ancient Greece (OTM)
Ancient Rome (OTM)
Humanities
Mindful Creativity
Ideas and Society
Innovation and Society
Nonviolence and Conflict Transformation Theory and Practice
Information Literacy for College Research
Literature
Reading Fiction (OTM)
Reading Drama (OTM)
Reading Poetry
Ethnic American Literature 2
Writing About Literature
Multicultural Literatures: The North American Experience-Honors-WAC (OTM) 2
Multicultural Literatures: The Non-European World-Honors-WAC (OTM) 1
Music
Music Theory For The Non-Major
Introduction To Music (OTM)
History Of Jazz (OTM) 2
History Of Rock And Roll (OTM)
Musical Diversity In The United States (OTM) 2
Cultures And Music Of Non-Western Styles (OTM) 1
Philosophy
Introduction To Logic (OTM)
Critical Thinking (OTM)
World Philosophies
Introduction To Philosophy (OTM)
Contemporary Moral Problems (OTM)
Religion
World Religions (OTM) 1
Introduction To Religion (OTM)
Understanding The Monotheistic Religions (OTM) 1
Old Testament/Tanakh (OTM)
New Testament History And Ideas (OTM)
Theatre
Introduction To Theatre (OTM)
Total Hours6

B. Social Sciences

Courses intended to fulfill the social science area should be broad, survey-type courses that emphasize methods of thinking and approaches to problems rather than merely material specific to that field. A core curriculum course in social science should integrate factual, institutional, methodological and basic theoretical issues involved in the study of society or human behavior. The course should emphasize critical thinking across a broad range of social and behavioral topics. Ideally, such a course will be interdisciplinary – for example, an economics course might deal not only with principles of economics, but also with politics, psychology, geography, anthropology and/or sociology. Generally, such courses may not be suitable for prospective majors. 

In order to qualify for the core curriculum in social science, a course need not contain all of the elements, but should strive for a preponderance, of the following criteria:

  1. Provide an introduction to social science theory and/or methodology;
  2. Reveal, describe, analyze and critically evaluate the connections between and among human beings and their place in the world, whether ethical, cultural, physical, or social;
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of social, economic and political institutions and processes, and their interrelationship within the United States and/or world;
  4. Provide orientations toward collective behavior;
  5. Present cross-cultural orientations;
  6. Provide multivariable explanations of social issues;
  7. Provide macro (institutional/societal) and micro (individual and small group) approaches; and,
  8. Provide frameworks or settings for applied learning, knowledge or skills.

In addition, a student who completes the core curriculum in social sciences should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively: All core curriculum programs include a component for writing; many also include a component for oral communication or presentation
  2. Evaluate arguments in a logical fashion: Competence in analysis and logical argument are explicit learning goals for most core curriculum programs, although these skills go by a variety of names (e.g., critical thinking, analysis, logical thinking, etc.)
  3. Employ the methods of inquiry characteristic of natural sciences, social sciences, and the arts and humanities: The tools for solving problems vary across disciplines; the core curriculum introduces students to methods of inquiry in several fields of study and thereby prepares students to integrate information from different disciplines
  4. Acquire an understanding of our global and diverse culture and society
  5. Engage in our democratic society: One of the overarching goals of general the core curriculum is to prepare students to be active and informed citizens, the development of a disposition to participate in and contribute to our democracy is full of equal importance to the goal of having the skills to do so intelligently.
Social Sciences
Select two courses; minimum of six hours total from the following; no more than one course from any discipline:6
Anthropology
Introduction To Anthropology (OTM)
Introduction To Archaeology (OTM)
Human Society Through Film 1
Human Evolution
World Prehistory (OTM)
Cultural Anthropology (OTM) 1
African American Culture (OTM) 2
Introduction to Disability Studies
Economics
Introduction To Economic Issues (OTM)
Principles Of Macroeconomics (OTM)
Principles of Macroeconomics with Data Applications
Principles Of Microeconomics (OTM)
Education
Introduction to Peace and Justice Studies
Geography
People, Places, and Society (OTM)
Environmental Sustainability (OTM)
Political Science
American National Government (OTM)
Psychology
Principles Of Psychology (OTM)
Sociology
Multicultural Toledo 2
Introduction To Sociology (OTM)
Social Problems
Communities - Writing Across the Curriculum
Race, Class, And Gender (OTM) 2
Racial and Ethnic Minorities in the United States 2
Sociology Of Sport
African American Culture (OTM) 2
Introduction To Gender Studies: Gender, Sex And Difference
Women's Roles: A Global Perspective (OTM) 1
Social Work
Introduction To Social Welfare 2
Total Hours6

C. Natural Sciences

A course intended to fulfill the natural sciences area should expose students to the process of scientific inquiry and encourage development of a perspective of science in the world. Such a course should not merely provide facts, but an understanding of the basic issues, methodologies and theories that drive inquiry in the major disciplinary areas of the sciences.

Courses would normally be drawn from the biological sciences, environmental sciences, geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy. Emphasis should be placed on reasoning skills rather than recall of scientific content or a high level of skill in mathematics or reading.

In order to qualify for the core curriculum in natural sciences, a course need not contain all of the elements, but should strive for a preponderance, of the following criteria:

  1. Provide an understanding of the nature of science in general and of major scientific concepts;
  2. Provide analysis and evaluation of scientific information;
  3. Provide discipline specific principles and information;
  4. Present applications and demonstrate the value of the discipline to society in general; and,
  5. Introduce scientific reasoning skills.

In addition, a student who completes the core curriculum in natural sciences should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively: All core curriculum programs include a component for writing; many also include a component for oral communication or presentation
  2. Evaluate arguments in a logical fashion: Competence in analysis and logical argument are explicit learning goals for most core curriculum programs, although these skills go by a variety of names (e.g., critical thinking, analysis, logical thinking, etc.)
  3. Employ the methods of inquiry characteristic of natural sciences, social sciences, and the arts and humanities: The tools for solving problems vary across disciplines; the core curriculum introduces students to methods of inquiry in several fields of study and thereby prepares students to integrate information from different disciplines
  4. Acquire an understanding of our global and diverse culture and society
  5. Engage in our democratic society: One of the overarching goals of the core curriculum is to prepare students to be active and informed citizens, the development of a disposition to participate in and contribute to our democracy is full of equal importance to the goal of having the skills to do so intelligently.
Natural Sciences
Select two courses; minimum of six hours total from the following including one laboratory; no more than one course from any discipline:6
Anatomy/Physiology
Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology Lab
Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology
Human Anatomy And Physiology I Lab
Human Anatomy
Human Anatomy Lab
Anatomy and Physiology I (OTM)
Astronomy
Survey Of Astronomy (OTM)
Solar System Astronomy (OTM)
Stars, Galaxies, And The Universe (OTM)
Elementary Astronomy Laboratory (OTM)
Biology
Survey Of Biology (OTM) 1
Survey Of Biology Laboratory
Major Concepts In Biology
Fundamentals Of Life Science: Diversity Of Life, Evolution And Adaptation (OTM) 1
Fundamentals Of Life Science Laboratory: Diversity Of Life, Evolution And Adaptation (OTM)
Fundamentals of Life Science: Biomolecules, Cells, and Inheritance (OTM) 1
Fundamentals of Life Science Laboratory: Biomolecules, Cells, and Inheritance (OTM)
Chemistry
Chemistry And Society (OTM)
Chemistry For Health Sciences (OTM) 1
Chemistry And Society Laboratory (OTM)
General Chemistry I (OTM) 1
General Chemistry II (OTM) 1
General Chemistry Lab I (OTM) 1
General Chemistry Lab II (OTM) 1
Ecology (Environmental Biology)
Down To Earth: Environmental Science (OTM)
Environmental Solutions Laboratory
Marine Biology
Microbes And Society
Marine Biology Coral Reef Lab
Introduction To Environmental Studies
Biodiversity (OTM)
Biodiversity Laboratory
Geology
Physical Geology (OTM)
Introductory Geology Laboratory (OTM)
Geological Hazards And The Environment
Physical Science
Our Physical World (OTM)
Physical World Laboratory (OTM)
The World Of Atoms
Physics In Everyday Life
Physics Of Music And Sound (OTM)
Jurassic Physics
Physics Of Light And Color (OTM)
The Nature Of Science
Introduction To Physics (OTM)
Technical Physics I (OTM) 1
Technical Physics II (OTM) 1
General Physics I (OTM)
General Physics II (OTM) 1
Physics For Science And Engineering Majors I (OTM) 1
Physics For Science And Engineering Majors II (OTM) 1
Total Hours6

III. Electives

Students must take 9 additional hours from any of the above categories:

  • I.B Math,
  • II.A Arts and Humanities,
  • II.B Social Sciences or
  • II.C Natural Sciences.

IV. Multicultural Areas

This requirement aims to foster an understanding of and respect for different cultures and peoples, both within and outside the United States, through the study of their beliefs, customs, histories, values and interrelationships.

(Select one course from Diversity of U.S. Culture and one course from non-U.S. Diversity for a total of six hours. Students may satisfy both of the multicultural requirements with courses that simultaneously fulfill one course in II Distributive (II.A Arts and Humanities or II.B Social Sciences) and one course in III Electives):

A. Diversity of U.S. Culture

A Diversity of U.S. Culture course includes, but is not restricted to, an examination of the economic, political, philosophical, social or artistic life of distinct cultural communities in the United States. Cultural communities may include but are not limited to communities based on race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, beliefs and disability.

A student who completes the diversity of U.S. culture requirement should be able to:

  • Explain the cultural relationships between dominant and non-dominant cultures within the U.S;
  • Describe how diverse cultural communities contribute to the development of U.S. culture; and,
  • Compare complex social structures within diverse U.S. cultural communities.
Diversity of U.S. Culture
At minimum, select one course of at least three hours from the following:3
Multi-Cultural Approaches For Art Appreciation
Introduction To Africana Studies
Foundations Of Black Intellectual History
Entrepreneurship and the Black Community
Perspectives on African American Education
African American Culture (OTM) 1
Indians Of North America
The Irish-American Experience
Visual Construction Of Gender
North American Archaeology
Managing Diversity In The Workplace
Cultural Communications In The Workplace
Introduction to Disability Studies
Economics Of Gender
Ethnic American Literature 2
Women And Literature
African American Writers Before The 20th Century
African American Literature In The 20th and 21st Century
Native American Literature And Culture
Geography of US and Canada
American Indian History
The American West
African-American History To 1865
African-American History From 1865
Ethnic America
American Labor And Working Class History
Women In American History
Women In Early America
Slavery In America
The United States And Latin America
Multicultural Toledo 1
Multicultural Literatures: The North American Experience-Honors-WAC (OTM) 2
Best Practices in Diversity Leadership
History Of Jazz (OTM) 2
Musical Diversity In The United States (OTM) 2
Feminism And Philosophy
Women And Politics
African-American Politics
Race and American Politics
Law, Policy And The Politics of Sexuality
Stereotyping, Prejudice, & Discrimination
Race, Class, And Gender (OTM) 1
Racial and Ethnic Minorities in the United States 2
Introduction To Social Welfare 1
Diversity In Contemporary Society
Introduction To Gender Studies: Gender, Sex And Difference
Girlhood and Adolescence
Contemporary U.S. Queer Cultures
Women and the Body
Queer Theory WAC
Total Hours3

B. Non-U.S. Diversity

A Non-U.S. Diversity course includes, but is not restricted to, an examination of the economic, political, philosophical, social or artistic life of communities outside the United States that did not contribute to the dominant culture in the United States.

A student who completes the non-U.S. diversity requirement should be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of cultural communities outside the United States;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of responsible citizenship in a global society;
  • Explain the cultural relationships between dominant and non-dominant populations outside the United States;
  • Compare complex social structures within diverse cultural communities outside the United States; and,
  • Recognize contemporary global issues facing a non-U.S. culture.
Non-U.S. Diversity
At minimum, select one course of at least three hours from the following:3
Introduction To The African Experience
Foundation Of Culture In The African Diaspora
African Politics
Human Society Through Film 1
Cultural Anthropology (OTM) 1
Cultural Diversity in Business
Food, Health, Society
Peoples Of World: An Evolutionary Approach
Peoples Of Subsaharan Africa
Medical Anthropology
Anthropology Of Religion
Culture and Commerce in the Arabic-Speaking World 2
Culture of the Arabic-Speaking World 2
Asian Art
Ethnographic Art
African Art
Ancient Art Of The Americas
Introduction to Asian Studies
Issues in Asian Studies
Chinese Culture
Comparative Economic Systems
World Literature And Cultures
World Cinemas And Cultures
World Cultures through Literature and Cinema in Translation
Intercultural Communication: Principles And Practice
Cross-Cultural Understanding
Cultural Geography
World Regional Geography
Geography Of Asia
Geography Of Africa
Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
Geography Of Gypsies (Romanies) and Travelers - WAC
Principles Of Global Studies
World History To 1500 1
The Contemporary World (OTM) 2
East Asia To 1800 (OTM) 2
East Asia From 1800 (OTM) 2
Latin American Civilizations (OTM) 2
African Civilization (OTM) 2
Middle East Civilization (OTM) 2
Ancient Near East (OTM) 2
Medieval Russia
Modern Russia
Japan And World War II
Postwar Japan
The Chinese Revolution
Colonial Latin America
Modern Latin America
History Of The Middle East From 600 To 1500
History Of The Middle East Since 1500
Africa To 1800
LGBTQ History in America
People And Politics In Mexico
Imperial Russia, 1700-1917
20th Century Russia
Modern Chinese History
Modern Japanese History
Multicultural Literatures: The Non-European World-Honors-WAC (OTM) 2
Understanding Cultural Differences For Business
Japanese Culture And Commerce 2
Introduction To Japanese Culture 2
Introduction to Latin American and Latinx Studies
Cultures And Music Of Non-Western Styles (OTM) 2
World Philosophies
Eastern Thought
Current International Problems
Politics of Africa
Politics of Latin America
Politics of the Middle East
Politics of Asia
World Religions (OTM) 2
Understanding The Monotheistic Religions (OTM) 2
Introduction To Islam
Islam
Eastern Thought
Contemporary Issues In Islam
Women's Roles: A Global Perspective (OTM) 1
Social Change in Developing Nations
Culture Of Latin America 2
Global Issues In Women's Studies
Gender In Cross-Cultural Perspective
Total Hours3